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Homosexual Infiltration Of The Catholic Church

Irapuato
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TVCatholic — May 18, 2010 — viewers.multicastmedia.com/viewer/viewerframes_parent.asp The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy, Enrique Rueda www.amazon.com/…/0815957149More
TVCatholic — May 18, 2010 — viewers.multicastmedia.com/viewer/viewerframes_parent.asp
The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy, Enrique
Rueda
www.amazon.com/…/0815957149
Irapuato
Irapuato 10/06/2011 21:10:20
www.newsweek.com/…/gays-and-the-se…
Newsweek Gays And The Seminary May 20, 2002
There will never be a gay students' group--or gay film series or gay dance--at St. John's Seminary, one of the most respected training grounds for Catholic priests in the nation. Yet the 64-year-old institution, nestled in the hills of Camarillo, Calif., may be one of the country's …More
Irapuato 10/06/2011 21:10:20
www.newsweek.com/…/gays-and-the-se…
Newsweek Gays And The Seminary May 20, 2002
There will never be a gay students' group--or gay film series or gay dance--at St. John's Seminary, one of the most respected training grounds for Catholic priests in the nation. Yet the 64-year-old institution, nestled in the hills of Camarillo, Calif., may be one of the country's gayest facilities for higher education. Depending on whom you ask, gay and bisexual men make up anywhere from 30 percent to 70 percent of the student body at the college and graduate levels. "I don't want people to think that in a negative way," says a 28-year-old gay alumnus, who believes all seminarians there are chaste, regardless of orientation. "It isn't like Christopher Street or West Hollywood. But some seminarians are gay, openly gay, and very loud about it."
Though they constitute just over 5 percent of the population, gay men may make up half the student body at the 76 high-school, college and graduate-level seminaries across the country, according to broad estimates. For decades Roman Catholic Church leaders have quietly reckoned with this surprising truth about seminary life. There is no rule against celibate gays as seminarians, theologians say. But for a church where priests preach that homosexuality is an "intrinsic evil," it is at the least incongruous that so many would-be priests are gay.
American church leaders are now wrestling with these demographic realities, in part because some of them are blaming gays for the growing crisis. Last week, while Cardinal Bernard Law was ordered to say what he knew about abusive Boston priests and the Rev. Paul Shanley and another cleric were arrested and charged with raping young boys, dioceses across the country were preparing for a lengthy evaluation, or "apostolic visitation," of U.S. seminary cultures and admissions policies to see if more gays should be screened out. The Vatican had agreed to conduct this study, which will begin immediately, at last month's summit with American cardinals.
Rome's sentiments on this subject are well known. Though the pope has not addressed the issue of gay seminarians publicly, last year the Most Rev. Tarcisio Bertone, secretary of the Vatican's Doctrinal Congregation, declared, "Persons with a homosexual inclination should not be admitted to the seminary." A small number of American church leaders are now echoing that thought. They consider the widening scandal to be a "homosexual-type problem," as Detroit Cardinal Adam Maida has said, despite the near plurality among psychologists, sociologists and theologians--even abuse victims --who say that is not case. "It's not a homosexual issue," says the Rev. Jim Walsh, of the National Catholic Educational Association. "The issue is identifying the sick members that need help and need to be removed."
Details of the imminent evaluation are not yet known. The Rev. Edward Burns, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops officer in charge of vocations who will likely be the Vatican's U.S. point man, says gay admissions, psychological screening tests and enforcement of celibacy rules will all be examined.
Among the concerns of American prelates are reports that an aggressive gay ethos has arisen on campus, manifesting in unwelcoming cliques and ecclesiastic flamboyance--a tendency to embrace the stagier elements of the liturgy, for instance. Witnessing this, some may conclude that the men are freely breaking their vows, but there is no evidence of this. Regardless, books on the subject argue that heterosexual seminarians feel so uncomfortable in this culture that they question their vocations. "People I know quite well have left the seminary either in disgust because people are not keeping vows, or in alienation because they're not gay. In some cases it's a serious problem," says R. Scott Appleby, a history professor at Notre Dame. The Most Rev. Wilton Gregory, who heads the bishops' group, has come to a similar conclusion. "[T]here does exist a homosexual atmosphere or dynamic that makes heterosexual men think twice," he said last month. Such complaints irritate gay clergymen and their defenders. "I think straight priests and seminarians shouldn't be whining," says the Rev. Charles Bouchard, president of the Aquinas Institute of Theology in St. Louis. "I just don't think it's a big deal."
Right now, gays are admitted to seminaries as long as they meet the same rigorous standards as straights. They must pass written psychological exams including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, which can detect a broad list of traits, though not sexual orientation. In addition, applicants undergo in-depth and extremely personal inter-views. According to admissions officers, it is common to inquire into an applicant's sexual orientation point-blank.
St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Philadelphia is believed to be the only one in America that bans gays outright, seminary officials say. Most others, like St. Patrick's Seminary near San Francisco, have no restrictions. "Shouldn't you consider a homosexual as equally fit? I would think yes," says the Rev. Gerald Coleman, the rector there. However, a growing number of administrators are adopting specific requirements for flagging gays with notorious histories. At St. Mary seminary in Mundelein, Ill., men who have HIV are excluded, according to the provost, the Rev. Thomas Baima, while Conception Seminary College in Missouri is considering a criminal-background check of applicants.
Modern seminary practice nonetheless encourages all students to reflect on their own sexuality without fear of reprisal, says the Rt. Rev. Jeremiah McCarthy, director of accreditation for the Association of Theological Schools. This represents a major sea change. Decades ago celibacy training at the seminaries was conducted entirely in euphemisms--even the human-sexuality chapters of moral-theology textbooks were written in Latin, as if in code. Pope John Paul II changed that in a 1992 call for one-on-one "priestly formation," in which a faculty member helps mentor seminarians through all aspects of their spiritual growth, including psychological and psychosexual development. These checks and balances have resulted in a sharp reduction in charges of sexual abuse, experts say.
News of the Vatican's probe has drawn mixed reactions. Dr. Jon Fuller, a priest and physician at Boston Medical Center who specializes in treating priests afflicted with AIDS, calls the effort to screen out gays "unfortunate." Not only will it further reduce the number of seminarians, which has plunged from 49,000 in 1965 to fewer than 4,000 today, but it may also reintroduce a code of secrecy among those gay men who enter the seminary anyway--or discover they're gay only after enrolling. "If we now say you can only be approved if you're straight or appear to be straight, we really are creating a very dysfunctional situation that from a psychological perspective is tempting disaster," he says. "It brings us back to a very unhealthy time."
At St. John's, officials welcome the study. "I think we do a good job recruiting solid candidates, and welcome the opportunity to do better," says the Rt. Rev. Helmut Hefner, the school's rector. He accepts that his gay enrollment may be as high as 50 percent, but that hasn't caused any discomfort to heterosexuals, much less an epidemic of straight flight, he says. Jim Bevacqua, the student-body president, agrees. "I can speak firsthand, as a heterosexual seminarian. I have a lot of friends here who are heterosexual, I know they are, and this has never been an issue here at our seminary. To be honest, people don't talk about it much." With the upcoming Vatican investigation, that will likely change.
Irapuato
ACLumsden
Si claro! Que tan feo cara hermana!!
Irapuato
www.newsweek.com/…/gays-and-the-se…

Newsweek
Gays And The Seminary

May 20, 2002

There will never be a gay students' group--or gay film series or gay dance--at St. John's Seminary, one of the most respected training grounds for Catholic priests in the nation. Yet the 64-year-old institution, nestled in the hills of Camarillo, Calif., may be one of the country's gayest facilities for …More
www.newsweek.com/…/gays-and-the-se…

Newsweek
Gays And The Seminary

May 20, 2002

There will never be a gay students' group--or gay film series or gay dance--at St. John's Seminary, one of the most respected training grounds for Catholic priests in the nation. Yet the 64-year-old institution, nestled in the hills of Camarillo, Calif., may be one of the country's gayest facilities for higher education. Depending on whom you ask, gay and bisexual men make up anywhere from 30 percent to 70 percent of the student body at the college and graduate levels. "I don't want people to think that in a negative way," says a 28-year-old gay alumnus, who believes all seminarians there are chaste, regardless of orientation. "It isn't like Christopher Street or West Hollywood. But some seminarians are gay, openly gay, and very loud about it."
Though they constitute just over 5 percent of the population, gay men may make up half the student body at the 76 high-school, college and graduate-level seminaries across the country, according to broad estimates. For decades Roman Catholic Church leaders have quietly reckoned with this surprising truth about seminary life. There is no rule against celibate gays as seminarians, theologians say. But for a church where priests preach that homosexuality is an "intrinsic evil," it is at the least incongruous that so many would-be priests are gay.
American church leaders are now wrestling with these demographic realities, in part because some of them are blaming gays for the growing crisis. Last week, while Cardinal Bernard Law was ordered to say what he knew about abusive Boston priests and the Rev. Paul Shanley and another cleric were arrested and charged with raping young boys, dioceses across the country were preparing for a lengthy evaluation, or "apostolic visitation," of U.S. seminary cultures and admissions policies to see if more gays should be screened out. The Vatican had agreed to conduct this study, which will begin immediately, at last month's summit with American cardinals.
Rome's sentiments on this subject are well known. Though the pope has not addressed the issue of gay seminarians publicly, last year the Most Rev. Tarcisio Bertone, secretary of the Vatican's Doctrinal Congregation, declared, "Persons with a homosexual inclination should not be admitted to the seminary." A small number of American church leaders are now echoing that thought. They consider the widening scandal to be a "homosexual-type problem," as Detroit Cardinal Adam Maida has said, despite the near plurality among psychologists, sociologists and theologians--even abuse victims --who say that is not case. "It's not a homosexual issue," says the Rev. Jim Walsh, of the National Catholic Educational Association. "The issue is identifying the sick members that need help and need to be removed."
Details of the imminent evaluation are not yet known. The Rev. Edward Burns, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops officer in charge of vocations who will likely be the Vatican's U.S. point man, says gay admissions, psychological screening tests and enforcement of celibacy rules will all be examined.
Among the concerns of American prelates are reports that an aggressive gay ethos has arisen on campus, manifesting in unwelcoming cliques and ecclesiastic flamboyance--a tendency to embrace the stagier elements of the liturgy, for instance. Witnessing this, some may conclude that the men are freely breaking their vows, but there is no evidence of this. Regardless, books on the subject argue that heterosexual seminarians feel so uncomfortable in this culture that they question their vocations. "People I know quite well have left the seminary either in disgust because people are not keeping vows, or in alienation because they're not gay. In some cases it's a serious problem," says R. Scott Appleby, a history professor at Notre Dame. The Most Rev. Wilton Gregory, who heads the bishops' group, has come to a similar conclusion. "[T]here does exist a homosexual atmosphere or dynamic that makes heterosexual men think twice," he said last month. Such complaints irritate gay clergymen and their defenders. "I think straight priests and seminarians shouldn't be whining," says the Rev. Charles Bouchard, president of the Aquinas Institute of Theology in St. Louis. "I just don't think it's a big deal."
Right now, gays are admitted to seminaries as long as they meet the same rigorous standards as straights. They must pass written psychological exams including the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory, which can detect a broad list of traits, though not sexual orientation. In addition, applicants undergo in-depth and extremely personal inter-views. According to admissions officers, it is common to inquire into an applicant's sexual orientation point-blank.
St. Charles Borromeo Seminary in Philadelphia is believed to be the only one in America that bans gays outright, seminary officials say. Most others, like St. Patrick's Seminary near San Francisco, have no restrictions. "Shouldn't you consider a homosexual as equally fit? I would think yes," says the Rev. Gerald Coleman, the rector there. However, a growing number of administrators are adopting specific requirements for flagging gays with notorious histories. At St. Mary seminary in Mundelein, Ill., men who have HIV are excluded, according to the provost, the Rev. Thomas Baima, while Conception Seminary College in Missouri is considering a criminal-background check of applicants.
Modern seminary practice nonetheless encourages all students to reflect on their own sexuality without fear of reprisal, says the Rt. Rev. Jeremiah McCarthy, director of accreditation for the Association of Theological Schools. This represents a major sea change. Decades ago celibacy training at the seminaries was conducted entirely in euphemisms--even the human-sexuality chapters of moral-theology textbooks were written in Latin, as if in code. Pope John Paul II changed that in a 1992 call for one-on-one "priestly formation," in which a faculty member helps mentor seminarians through all aspects of their spiritual growth, including psychological and psychosexual development. These checks and balances have resulted in a sharp reduction in charges of sexual abuse, experts say.
News of the Vatican's probe has drawn mixed reactions. Dr. Jon Fuller, a priest and physician at Boston Medical Center who specializes in treating priests afflicted with AIDS, calls the effort to screen out gays "unfortunate." Not only will it further reduce the number of seminarians, which has plunged from 49,000 in 1965 to fewer than 4,000 today, but it may also reintroduce a code of secrecy among those gay men who enter the seminary anyway--or discover they're gay only after enrolling. "If we now say you can only be approved if you're straight or appear to be straight, we really are creating a very dysfunctional situation that from a psychological perspective is tempting disaster," he says. "It brings us back to a very unhealthy time."
At St. John's, officials welcome the study. "I think we do a good job recruiting solid candidates, and welcome the opportunity to do better," says the Rt. Rev. Helmut Hefner, the school's rector. He accepts that his gay enrollment may be as high as 50 percent, but that hasn't caused any discomfort to heterosexuals, much less an epidemic of straight flight, he says. Jim Bevacqua, the student-body president, agrees. "I can speak firsthand, as a heterosexual seminarian. I have a lot of friends here who are heterosexual, I know they are, and this has never been an issue here at our seminary. To be honest, people don't talk about it much." With the upcoming Vatican investigation, that will likely change.
Irapuato
"going to Berlin and throwing eggs at the HOly Father because in their words "He is the symbol of their oppression!"
Irapuato likes this.
ACLumsden
Oh yes!! That is really on my mind of late. There are more than one or two students here who have had 3-5hr debates with me regarding going to Berlin and throwing eggs at the HOly Father because in their words "He is the symbol of their oppression!" I try to persuade them that their sexuality is NOT who they are, but a small part thereof, and the acting out of this is quite disordered. No only …More
Oh yes!! That is really on my mind of late. There are more than one or two students here who have had 3-5hr debates with me regarding going to Berlin and throwing eggs at the HOly Father because in their words "He is the symbol of their oppression!" I try to persuade them that their sexuality is NOT who they are, but a small part thereof, and the acting out of this is quite disordered. No only from a Religious point of view, but the scientific (anthropology and biology!). One was convinced, the other swore at me after being confound in their flawed reasoning and stormed off swearing at me.

So let us try to help the situation with works of charity and prayer.
Irapuato
Let' pray, now, that these gay people in Berlin respect the Pope when he visits...
ACLumsden
Yes Ira, however, one cannot allow generalisations which are uncharitable to slide. See my recent post on Kfarley's video.....
Irapuato
ACLumsden — 07/11/2010 17:07:58:
@bsolutions - A most comprehensive and clear posting (well supported mate!). Now this is the kind of thing we need more of here on Gloria.tv as opposed to just unsustantiated and/or unreasoned opinion!

Let's pray for these souls who have lost their way; the consequences of straying from the Path are evident.
Irapuato
bsolutions — 07/11/2010 04:08:01:
This priest is telling the truth. I knew Father Rueda personally. He told me how he put his book together. He interviewed the Gay rights pioneers posing as a journalist. His bishop, Matthew Clark, www.usao.edu/~facshaferi/CLARK.HTMLrewarded Father Rueda for his work by suspending his faculties! For a while Father Rueda took over Father Burns' column in The …More
bsolutions — 07/11/2010 04:08:01:
This priest is telling the truth. I knew Father Rueda personally. He told me how he put his book together. He interviewed the Gay rights pioneers posing as a journalist. His bishop, Matthew Clark, www.usao.edu/~facshaferi/CLARK.HTMLrewarded Father Rueda for his work by suspending his faculties! For a while Father Rueda took over Father Burns' column in The Wanderer but eventually he was forced to take a job in the private sector because he had to support his parents. I visited him in Miami where he lived with his mother who was in her nineties while serving in an executive position with an international company overseeing personell in Latin America. He held a B.S.in engineering and an MBA and also taught Business Administration in Florida International University. His genius is sorely missed today.
As for the infiltration of the Catholic priesthood, Bella Dodd's testimony with respect to the men she planted in Catholic seminaries while she was a communist says it all:

romancatholicheroes.blogspot.com/2009/03/bella-dodd.html

This is a quote from an interview with Alice VonHildebrand, wife of the philosopher who fled Nazi Germany and taught at Fordham:
"I can only tell you what I know. It is a matter of public record, for instance, that Bella Dodd, the ex-Communist who reconverted to the Church, openly spoke of the Communist Party’s deliberate infiltration of agents into the seminaries. She told my husband and me that when she was an active party member, she had dealt with no fewer than four cardinals within the Vatican "who were working for us."

Source: www.catholicmediacoalition.org/church_crisis_v…« Details »
Irapuato likes this.
3 more comments from Irapuato
Irapuato
The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy, Enrique Rueda www.amazon.com/…/0815957149
Irapuato likes this.
Irapuato
The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy, Enrique
Rueda
www.amazon.com/…/0815957149
Irapuato
Dear TES: Yes, that is "a gimmick" of the devil--that we should "tolerate" everthing, even trash. And, yes, you are so right about the ROSARY. I usually pray it at 6:00 a.m. with Father Mitch on EWTN, but maybe gloria.tv should have a video-stream, too, off and on, all day long, to remind us to pray it, and we could all pray together!
TES
All we can do is to pray! We should not forget hte Holy Rosary! Our Lady herself has reminded us over and over againabout the power of the Rosary. Here we have one IMPORTANT subject for prayer.
The Lutheran Church in Finland has a pastor who had a sex-change operation done last year. He - now she - was all open about it! And he/she keeps on staying a pastor of the Finnish Lutheran Church. I …More
All we can do is to pray! We should not forget hte Holy Rosary! Our Lady herself has reminded us over and over againabout the power of the Rosary. Here we have one IMPORTANT subject for prayer.
The Lutheran Church in Finland has a pastor who had a sex-change operation done last year. He - now she - was all open about it! And he/she keeps on staying a pastor of the Finnish Lutheran Church. I cannot understand, how all this that is so absolutely and clearly against the Holy Bible, can be tolerated and accepted in such a way! I respect those people as human beings - all the people are equal. But there are limits when it comes to cerving God! A Priest should be the excample to his congrigation about how to live properly a good Christian life and how to try to be as holy as we sinners can. How can they do that if they are homosexuals or transsexuals?!? Many people say, we should not try to live according to values and opinions that are over 2000 years old. Welll I'm sorry, but I must say, that a real TRUTH will hold forever. The Church is supposed to teach us God's will. We can see what has happened with the protestant churches - everybody does what they want - and if they don't find a church that fits their life style, they put up their own church!
All we can do is to hold on to the teaching of the Holy Catholic Church and pray the Rosary daily; and hope that those homosexual Priests would soon see that they are on the wrong path, make a change in thei life and pray God for forgiveness!
marthe2010
Let us pray for our Church and for our Holy Father. Let's never stop to do so, I really think this is the most important thing we can do for our church and the Holy Father. Thank you bsolutions, for the link to the interview with Dr. Hildebrandt - very interesting.
Irapuato likes this.
Irapuato
@bsolutions: Thank you for sharing this testimony with us!!!
ACLumsden
NB./ "Unsustantiated" in the below comment ought to read "unsubstantiated". Thanks
bsolutions
This priest is telling the truth. I knew Father Rueda personally. He told me how he put his book together. He interviewed the Gay rights pioneers posing as a journalist. His bishop, Matthew Clark, www.usao.edu/~facshaferi/CLARK.HTMLrewarded Father Rueda for his work by suspending his faculties! For a while Father Rueda took over Father Burns' column in The Wanderer but eventually he was …More
This priest is telling the truth. I knew Father Rueda personally. He told me how he put his book together. He interviewed the Gay rights pioneers posing as a journalist. His bishop, Matthew Clark, www.usao.edu/~facshaferi/CLARK.HTMLrewarded Father Rueda for his work by suspending his faculties! For a while Father Rueda took over Father Burns' column in The Wanderer but eventually he was forced to take a job in the private sector because he had to support his parents. I visited him in Miami where he lived with his mother who was in her nineties while serving in an executive position with an international company overseeing personell in Latin America. He held a B.S.in engineering and an MBA and also taught Business Administration in Florida International University. His genius is sorely missed today.
As for the infiltration of the Catholic priesthood, Bella Dodd's testimony with respect to the men she planted in Catholic seminaries while she was a communist says it all:

romancatholicheroes.blogspot.com/2009/03/bella-dodd.html

This is a quote from an interview with Alice VonHildebrand, wife of the philosopher who fled Nazi Germany and taught at Fordham:
"I can only tell you what I know. It is a matter of public record, for instance, that Bella Dodd, the ex-Communist who reconverted to the Church, openly spoke of the Communist Party’s deliberate infiltration of agents into the seminaries. She told my husband and me that when she was an active party member, she had dealt with no fewer than four cardinals within the Vatican "who were working for us."

Source: www.catholicmediacoalition.org/church_crisis_v…
Irapuato likes this.
dorcatholic
Would it be possible to share the name of this priest and when and where this recording was made?

Thanks.
Abramo
I am afraid that what this priest says, is all true.

Irapuato likes this.
Irapuato
You are welcome. I have to add: at Catholic schools I kept seeing more and more Lesbian and homosexual teachers being hired--sadly...
Bob Jones papist
thanks Irapuato: for the info. i like the factual info.very good,,, but i stay far away from the disobedient 'Bayside Prophecies' and interpretations of "Our Lady? of the Roses".
pax
Irapuato
EWTN personality Fr. John Trigilio stated: “The few times I was there, some of the seminarians would literally dress like gays from the Village. They would even go so far as to wear pink silk; it was like going to see La Cage Aux Folles.” Fr. John Despard states: “In my days at St. Mary’s, down the hall there would be two guys together in the shower and everybody knew it” (Michael S. Rose, Good…More
EWTN personality Fr. John Trigilio stated: “The few times I was there, some of the seminarians would literally dress like gays from the Village. They would even go so far as to wear pink silk; it was like going to see La Cage Aux Folles.” Fr. John Despard states: “In my days at St. Mary’s, down the hall there would be two guys together in the shower and everybody knew it” (Michael S. Rose, Goodbye! Good Men, p. 93).
St. John’s Seminary, Camarillo, California
From a May 20, 2002 Newsweek article: “… The 64-year-old institution, nestled in the hills of Camarillo, Calif., may be one of the country’s gayest facilities for higher education. Depending on whom you ask, gay and bisexual men make up anywhere from 30 percent to 70 percent of the student body at the college and graduate levels. ‘I don’t want people to think that in a negative way,’ says a 28-year-old gay alumnus.”
… “I think we do a good job recruiting solid candidates, and welcome the opportunity to do better,” says the Rt. Rev. Helmut Hefner, the school’s rector. He accepts that his gay enrollment may be as high as 50 percent, but that hasn’t caused any discomfort to heterosexuals, much less an epidemic of straight flight, he says. (“Gays and the seminary,” Newsweek, May 20, 2002)

A May 19, 2002 article from the Ventura County Star reports:
“At St. John's Seminary and Seminary College in Camarillo, leaders said that as long as priests and seminarians commit to celibacy, sexual orientation is not a primary concern. They are taken aback at the suggestion of screening out gay students. ‘Good heavens no, that is not the solution,’ said the Rev. Kenneth Rudnick, president and rector of the seminary college. "That's not part of the problem. There is no problem. As long as one is celibate, that is all the church requires." (“Local clergy disagree about gay priests, Ventura County Star, May 19, 2002)
Hello-o-o!!! "Advancement to religious vows and ordination should be barred to those who are afflicted with evil tendencies to homosexuality or pederasty, since for them the common life and the priestly ministry would constitute serious dangers."(Sacred Congregation for Religious, February 1961)
The Ventura County Star also reports:
“Some former St. John's students have talked about promiscuity at the campus in the 1980s. An affidavit that was part of a molestation lawsuit against an Orange County priest contended students and a priest had made homosexual advances and also included second-hand allegations of sexual abuse.” (“Local clergy disagree about gay priests, Ventura County Star, May 19, 2002)
St. Anthony’s Seminary, Santa Barbara, California
Allegations surfaced in 1993 that 34 boys at St. Anthony's Seminary had been molested by 11 monks over a 23-year period ending in 1987, when the seminary closed for financial reasons. At the time, the provincial minister of the order publicly called the findings a "terrible truth" and "horrific."
St. Patrick’s Seminary, Menlo Park, California
In a May 20, 2002 interview with Newsweek magazine, St. Patrick’s Seminary rector Fr. Coleman stated:

“’Shouldn’t you consider a homosexual as equally fit? I would think yes,’ says the Rev. Gerald Coleman, the rector there.” (“Gays and the seminary,” Newsweek, May 20, 2002)

During the campaign over Proposition 22, which defined marriage in California, Bishop Tod Brown (Diocese of Orange, CA) sent a memo on February 15, 2000 to the priests of the diocese of Orange: "Attached are two articles, 'Moral Theology' and 'Is Proposition 22 Discriminatory?', by Father Gerald D. Coleman, SS, regarding the marriage initiative, you will find them helpful to you."

The article by seminary rector Fr. Coleman included these horrendous statements:

"Some homosexual persons have shown that it is possible to enter into long-term, committed and loving relationships, named by certain segments of our society as domestic partnership. I see no reason why civil law could not in some fashion recognize these faithful and loving unions with clear and specified benefits. These unions would then be recognized by society as sustaining an important status deserving our respect and protection. I believe that this possibility could be pursued without equating such unions with marriage, and without in any way demeaning our needed respect and protection for the institution of marriage."

Fr. Coleman doesn’t know what he is taking about. The Vatican's Pontifical Council for the Family stated on July 26, 2000:

"With regard to the recent legislative attempts to make the family and de facto unions equivalent, including homosexual unions (it is good to keep in mind that their juridical recognition is the first step toward their equivalency), members of parliament should be reminded about their grave responsibility to oppose them, for ‘lawmakers, and in particular Catholic members of parliaments, should not favor this type of legislation with their vote because it is contrary to the common good and the truth about man and thus truly unjust’. These legal initiatives present all the characteristics of non-conformity to the natural law which makes them incompatible with the dignity of the law…. the family based on marriage is a fundamental and precious good for the whole society whose most solid fabric is built on the values that are developed in family relations and guaranteed by stable marriage. The good generated by marriage is basic for the Church which recognizes the family as the ‘domestic Church’. All this is endangered by abandoning the institution of marriage, which is implicit in de facto unions.” (Read more…)

Fr. Coleman still remains rector of St. Patrick’s, in charge of “forming” tomorrow’s future priests.

In 2000, a police sting operation caught the academic dean of St. Patrick’s Seminary, Fr. Carl A. Schipper, soliciting online for sex. Fr. Schipper was arrested on March 2, 2000. According to an article by San Francisco Faith:

“The 57 year-old priest fell under police suspicion in September while an investigation into the reported molestation of another 13-year-old boy yielded Schipper's America Online screen name, which was written on the boy's hand. Schipper is not a suspect in that case. San Jose police are examining the computers' memory caches at Schipper's home and his office at St. Patrick's seminary. Police are also looking into America Online archives to see if there were other juveniles involved. When asked if the solicitations were occurring from St. Patrick's seminary itself, Sergeant Hewitt of the San Jose Police department told this writer there was ample reason to obtain a search warrant for Schipper's offices at St. Patrick's.”

Responsibility for St. Patrick’s Seminary lies with Archbishop John Quinn of San Francisco (who was head of the National Conference of Catholic bishops from 1977-1980), and Archbishop William J. Levada who succeeded Archbishop Quinn to head the San Francisco Archdiocese on December 27, 1995.
St. John's Seminary, Boston, Massachusetts
In a May 15, 2002 article in the Boston Globe, it was reported that Cardinal Law provided a written assurance to Belmont Abbey College that the Rev. George C. Berthold had an unblemished record, despite Berthold's November 1995 dismissal from Boston's St. John's Seminary. Just two months after he became dean of St. John's undergraduate college, Berthold was accused of making improper advances toward a freshman seminarian, including kissing him on the lips. (Read more…)

Another article by the Boston Globe on March 3, 2002 made the connection between St. John’s Seminary, and the clerical sex abuse crisis within the Boston Archdiocese:

“The sexual-abuse scandal tearing at the local Roman Catholic Church has played out in courtrooms and psychiatrists' offices and even the chancery on Lake Street in Brighton. But ground zero could well be St. John's Seminary, a complex of tan brick and stone buildings down the street next to Boston College.
“A Herald analysis of cases of priests facing serious pedophile allegations in the state, including those who settled out of court or have been suspended by the church pending resolution of accusations, shows that a disproportionate percentage attended St. John's in the late 1950s and 1960s.
''This is the general pattern with these scandals across the board. They're usually guys now in their late 60s and 70s who received their priestly formation and were ordained in the '60s and '70s,'' said the Rev. Richard John Neuhaus, a Catholic priest who publishes ''First Things,'' a monthly journal popular with religious conservatives.” (Hub seminary linked to problem priests,” by Eric Convey March 3, 2002)

In a “letter to the editor” addressed to Catholic World Report (November 2000), former St. John’s seminarian Paul Sinsigalli reports that he was kicked out for his traditional Catholic beliefs, and for opposing the openly-gay culture at St. John’s Seminary:

“I read Michael Rose’s article on vocations with great interest. You see, until I had heard about this phenomenon I thought there was something wrong with me. I was studying at St. John’s Seminary in Boston and was told that I did not have the qualities required to be a priest. They said that I lacked leadership, intellectual ability, and emotional maturity, among other things. When I asked them to explain where these traits were exhibited they merely repeated the oft heard mantra: “It’s the consensus of the faculty,” and then would not defend or cite examples of said behavior. They had decided that I did not fit into their mold of what a priest should be.
“What were my crimes, you may ask? I stood up for what the Church teaches every time there was a question about it. I stood against the homosexual atmosphere which pervaded the college at that time and had the temerity to suggest that homosexuality is a disorder. I also did not engage in their pro-masturbation conversations which were commonplace in the halls and the dinner table. I was the target of a homosexual classmate who is known to …
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The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy, Enrique
Rueda
www.amazon.com/…/0815957149
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www.fatimacrusader.com/cr71/cr71pg15.asp

Clerical Scandals and the
"Negligence of the Pastors"

by John Vennari
It is hard to imagine a more distasteful subject than pedophilia and homosexuality in the Roman Catholic priesthood. It is even more disturbing to consider that homosexuals successfully targeted the Catholic Church for infiltration.
Yet these are the issues we are forced to confront …More
www.fatimacrusader.com/cr71/cr71pg15.asp

Clerical Scandals and the
"Negligence of the Pastors"

by John Vennari
It is hard to imagine a more distasteful subject than pedophilia and homosexuality in the Roman Catholic priesthood. It is even more disturbing to consider that homosexuals successfully targeted the Catholic Church for infiltration.
Yet these are the issues we are forced to confront at the same time Fatima revisionists claim that the 1984 Consecration of the world fulfilled Our Lady’s request for the Consecration of Russia, and that we are now witnessing the triumph of the Immaculate Heart. If the current state of the Church is an indication of Her triumph, I shudder to think of what would be Her defeat.
Crisis Foretold
In 1981, Father Joaquin Alonso, who had many conversations with Sister Lucy, and who was the official Fatima archivist for sixteen years, said, "It is therefore completely probable that the text (of the Third Secret of Fatima) makes concrete references to the crisis of faith within the Church and to the negligence of the pastors themselves [and the] internal struggles in the very bosom of the Church and of grave pastoral negligence of the upper hierarchy."(1)

Today’s clerical scandals are not because of mandatory celibacy, nor are they because we do not have women priests, married priests, or because there are no laity in Church authority. Rather, they are the result of the "negligence of the pastors" that Father Alonso (pictured above) maintained to be the essence of the Third Secret of Fatima.
The scandals are also the result of what Sister Lucy called the "diabolical disorientation" afflicting "so many persons who occupy places of responsibility" in the Church.(2) As will be demonstrated, the upper hierarchy has been so negligent and disoriented that it presided over a massive influx of homosexuals into the Catholic priesthood and religious orders.
And homosexuality is the real issue.
Most of today’s clerical scandals are not true cases of pedophilia (preying on pre-adolescent children) but of priests preying on teenage boys.(3) That’s homosexuality. Further, the homosexual network by and large is favorable to pedophilia and same-sex liaisons with teenagers.
This fact is admitted even by pederasts and many homosexuals. In 1998, for example, North American Man Boy Love Association (NAMBLA) representative David Thorstad eagerly proclaimed to a standing room only "gay" and lesbian group gathered in Mexico City that: "Pederasty is the main form that male homosexuality has acquired throughout Western civilization …"(4)
Further, it is well known, though not often reported in the press, that NAMBLA is a welcome participant in "Gay Pride" parades nationwide.(5)
Church Targeted
Father Enrique Rueda documented in his 1982 landmark work The Homosexual Network, Private Lives & Public Policy that homosexuals successfully targeted religious organizations for infiltration, especially the Roman Catholic Church.
The reason is clear. "There is no question" writes Father Rueda, "that the main stumbling block in the theoretical and practical acceptance of homosexuality by American society has been traditional religion. This has been perfectly understood by the leadership of the homosexual movement."(6) Further, "the importance of gaining the support of the churches or at least neutralizing them is widely acknowledged by homosexual leaders."(7)
The New York Times, for example, ran a story on January 25, 1977, entitled "From a Quiet Seminarian to Homosexual Spokesman". Journalist Lucy Fosburgh interviewed William R. Johnson, a homosexual activist who was "ordained" in the United Church of Christ.
In this interview, Johnson indicates several factors which are important for the advancement of homosexuality in the "church". (When Johnson says "church", he is misusing the term to mean all so-called Christian denominations as well as the Catholic Church.)
Johnson’s principles, explains Father Rueda, constitute a model program for the conversion of a "church" into an agent of the homosexual movement. The factors considered important to Johnson are:

Father Enrique Rueda documented in his 1982 landmark work The Homosexual Network, Private Lives & Public Policy that homosexuals successfully targeted religious organizations for infiltration, especially the Roman Catholic Church.
The desensitization of the church of sexual ethics.
Promotion of pro-homosexual legislation by religious bodies.
Organization of official commissions or similar bodies charged with studying the homosexual question.
Establishment of homosexual organizations within the churches. (The so-called "Catholic" homosexual organizations of New Ways Ministry and Dignity will be discussed shortly.)
The ordination of homosexuals to the ministry, preferably "liberated" homosexuals who are identified with the movement’s ideology. Johnson stated, "At the time I was deciding to try to get ordained, everybody told me: ‘Just pretend, hide the fact you’re homosexual. That’s what everybody else has done.’ But I couldn’t do it. I didn’t see how I could be a person of God and not be honest about myself".
Willingness of homosexual clergymen to accept dual roles as leaders in their religious bodies and the homosexual movement—in fact, as agents of the movement within their churches. Johnson explained that his notoriety catapulted him into leadership in the homosexual cause. "It became apparent" he said, "that gay people were no longer willing to be shunted into the back room of the church today in an atmosphere of secrecy and guilt."(8)
Johnson’s priorities, comments Father Rueda, not only indicated how important the religious institutions are to homosexuality, but provide a checklist for ascertaining the degree to which a specific religious institution has been infiltrated by the homosexual movement.(9)
The Hierarchy Let it Happen

Cardinal McCarrick giving shallow reassurances to the Press during the April 23-24 meeting of U.S. Cardinals in Rome.

Father Rueda then documents a vast homosexual network among various denominations, including the Roman Catholic Church. Significantly, Vatican II’s encouragement of "inter-religious dialogue" is what made possible the pan-religious cooperation among homosexual groups.(10) Today’s high number of homosexual priests is one of ecumenism’s first fruits.(11)
Father Rueda chronicled five primary means by which homosexuals infiltrated seminaries, chanceries, and Catholic institutions.
1) Patterns of Collaboration, citing many instances of cooperation between Roman Catholic institutions and leaders of the Homosexual Movement.
2) Intellectual Infiltration: This is done by Catholic theologians and "experts" who publicly challenge the Church’s condemnation of homosexuality, and suffer no ecclesiastical penalty for doing so. A few examples follow:
A 1977 editorial in the influential Jesuit magazine America made the false claim, "the application of Scriptural texts that condemn homosexuality is dubious at best".(12)
Dominican Father Donald Goergen authored a widely-distributed, pro-homosexual book entitled The Sexual Celibate. Far from suffering penalties from the Vatican’s Congregation for Religious, Goergen was elected Provincial of the Chicago Dominican Province, after the book was published.(13)
The February 1981 issue of Notre Dame Magazine, contained an article by Father Robert Griffin who spoke of a young homosexual man (un-named) who confessed that he had been "unfaithful" to his homosexual partner. Father Griffin writes that he absolved the young man’s "sin of unfaithfulness" and sent him home to his boyfriend.(14) There is no record that Father Griffin was ever disciplined by the bishops or the Vatican.
3) Networking: These are pro-homosexual groups such as the Catholic Coalition for Gay Civil Rights, "Call to Action" and numerous other organizations. Hundreds of Catholic "priests and religious in good standing" belong to these openly pro-homosexual groups.(15)
4) Homosexual Clergy: Father Rueda quotes a number of pro-homosexual clergymen, most notably, Christian Brother Gabriel Moran. While speaking to the 1977 Conference of Christian Brothers, Brother Moran intimated that religious communities were the ideal setting for homosexual relations.(16)
Then there’s the following quote taken from Communications, a newsletter for homosexual Catholic clergy: "I am finishing up my theological studies at the Jesuit School of Theology in Chicago. I was ordained last June. I work part time as assistant pastor of an inner-city parish in the Black community. I am gay. I have been out with my superiors since I was a novice, and aware of my gayness, they have approved me for vows and now for ordination."(17)
Father Rueda also explained the tactic of the homosexual movement to present "homosexuality and heterosexuality" as "two varieties of the same question".
5) Homosexual Orders: These are not formally approved orders in the Church, but groups that have organized while the local bishop looks the other way. Father Rueda lists a number of these, including Agape Community, The Christian Community Association, and Augustinians of Charity. One group of "gay Roman Catholics" called Emmaus House claimed to "work closely with our Roman Catholic parishes", visiting the sick, shut-ins and those in need. "We bring the Blessed Sacrament to them," said the Brooklyn-based organization.(18)
The two most successful of these "orders" are: the influential New Ways Ministry,(19) an organization, complains Father Rueda, whose very existence is "more than passively tolerated" by the U.S. bishops; the other is Dignity International, whose purpose is "to unite all gay Catholics, to develop leadership, and to be an instrument through which the gay Catholics may be heard by the Church and society." Dignity makes no secret that its goal is to "promote the cause of the gay Community ... We move towards the time when a gay Catholic lifestyle is accepted."(20)
Father Rueda lamented that the United …
Irapuato
www.cultureandfamily.org/articledisplay.asp
We Told You So: The Homosexual Network Twenty Years Later
By Connie Marshner
Courtesy Free Congress Foundation
Don’t you hate people who say “I told you so”?
Well, with apologies in advance, hold your horses. Here at Free Congress Foundation, we told you so.
The year was 1982; the book was The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy.…More
www.cultureandfamily.org/articledisplay.asp
We Told You So: The Homosexual Network Twenty Years Later
By Connie Marshner
Courtesy Free Congress Foundation
Don’t you hate people who say “I told you so”?
Well, with apologies in advance, hold your horses. Here at Free Congress Foundation, we told you so.
The year was 1982; the book was The Homosexual Network: Private Lives and Public Policy. The author was Enrique Rueda, a Catholic priest then in the diocese of Rochester, New York. The book had 522 footnoted pages of text, with another 160 pages of appendices and indexes. It not only analyzed the ideology of homosexuality, but it documented the spread of that ideology through religious organizations, including the Catholic Church, and traced the funding of it.
If you had read that book, you would not have been surprised by the revelations that have been coming out of Boston in the recent trial of Fr. Geoghan, on whose behalf the Archdiocese of Boston by 1998 had settled 50 pederasty cases while another 84 were pending.
Your jaw would not drop in disbelief when you read, as you might have in Crisis magazine last October, that every one of the 188 Catholic dioceses in the country have faced or are facing claims of child sex abuse.
In the book, Fr. Rueda detailed — with meticulous footnotes — what, already then, was the growing network of “support groups,” counseling referrals, newsletters, and organizations of homosexuals and pro-homosexuals in the churches of the United States, including the Catholic Church. The network was particularly effective within the Catholic Church: at one point in the late ‘70s, a key staffer at the Office of Public Affairs and Information of the U. S. Catholic Conference/National Conference of Catholic Bishops was a leader of the Washington, D.C., homosexual movement as well as president of Dignity, the pressure group which seeks to force the Catholic Church to relate to homosexuals according to the tenets of the homosexual ideology.
The name of the fair city of Boston appears frequently in Fr. Rueda’s pages, giving it the dubious distinction of being the birthplace of NAMBLA, the North American Man/Boy Love Association (an interesting coincidence in light of subsequent developments). Also interesting to note is that one Fr. Paul Shanley attended the NAMBLA convention in Boston, supposedly on behalf of the then-Cardinal Archbishop, Medeiros.
In the early days of “gay liberation,” 1972, a National Coalition of Gay Organizations adopted a “Gay Rights Platform.” This list of demands included one to repeal all laws governing the age of sexual consent — a matter of some obvious concern to pederasts.
“Homosexuality is no sicker than heterosexuality,” proclaimed the Third Number of the NAMBLA Journal. “What is sick is society’s efforts to supress [sic] and persecute it.”
In those days, every type of sexual activity was considered equally deserving of “liberation.” As pederast theoretician David Thorstad proclaimed it in the pages of Boston’s Gay Community News in January, 1979: “We should present ourselves not merely as defenders of our own personal rights to privacy and sexual expression, but as the champions of the right of all persons — regardless of age — to engage in the sexuality of their choice. We must recognize homosexual behavior for what it is — a natural potential of the human animal.”
By 1998, Thorstad was blasting the gay movement because it had “retreated from its vision of sexual liberation, in favor of integration and assimilation into existing social and political structures … increasingly sought to marginalize even demonize cross-generational love.”
Translation: The tacticians who won the internal battles, and therefore prevailed, realized that “We are everywhere” was a slogan that could sell. “Man/boy love” wouldn’t sell. Call it an “incremental” strategy, if you will.
It is going to be a long, long struggle to re-establish in mainstream Catholic culture an understanding and acceptance of what the Catholic Catechism teaches on homosexual acts — namely, that they are intrinsically disordered, and under no circumstances can be approved, while at the same time men and women who have homosexual tendencies must be accepted with respect, compassion and sensitivity.
A generation ago the first part of that was not disputed. It might be said that some of the trouble in Boston right now could be traced to successive bishops’ going overboard on the second part, on behalf of one of their priests. After all, priests are in the business of forgiving and healing people. It is understandable that a bishop would err in favor of thinking the best about and being quick to forgive his priests.
The homosexual movement has been very successful at removing the sensitivity and stigma formerly associated with non-heterosexual attractions. The whole sexual liberation movement, hetero as well as homo, has expertly manipulated public opinion for close to half a century. People are so afraid of “judge not, lest ye be judged” that they feel they must tolerate anything. Had these de-sensitizations not been so successful, Fr. Geoghan might not have gotten away with as much as he did for as long as he did.
According to the Boston Globe Online, the rector of O’Connell Seminary made a note in 1954 that John J. Geoghan showed a “very pronounced immaturity.” Nonetheless, in 1962 he was ordained. At his very first assignment, a senior priest complained that young Fr. Geoghan brought boys into his bedroom. It took until 1995 for the abuse that occurred then to be documented, and nobody really knows how much more has taken place since.
Whereas in 1954 it was politically correct for seminary authorities to look hard at a young man’s sexual orientation, 15 years later it was politically correct to be “open” to “new expressions.” And 30 years later, in many Catholic seminaries and dioceses, it was positively retrograde to disapprove of homosexuality or to acknowledge its ties to pederasty.
It is worth remembering that the 1960s and ‘70s were years of total turbulence in the Roman Catholic Church, with order only gradually becoming visible in the 1980s and ‘90s. Part of the zeitgeist of the ‘60s was “don’t trust anybody over 30.” Well, people under 30 hadn’t had much experience with priestly pederasty, thanks to the vigilance of people over 30. But inherited wisdom was out of fashion, and the cautions of older and wiser men were laughed at. Maybe the old ways weren’t perfect — but was the new one? Under which system were more innocent people injured?
The families of those victimized in Boston are probably wishing some things hadn’t gone quite so out of fashion. Some might be wishing that somebody in the Church had been a bit more “repressive” of Fr. Geoghan a lot sooner. Some even might be wishing that the right person in the Archdiocese of Boston had read Fr. Rueda’s book and heeded it.
Bob Jones papist
who is this priest, and what is the Title of the book/text he refers to ? thanks.