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Francis’ Silence Speaks Volumes Francis' silence on the Communion vote of the American bishops speaks volumes, Jason Horowitz writes in the oligarchs’ New York Times. Horowitz himself is an outspoken…More
Francis’ Silence Speaks Volumes

Francis' silence on the Communion vote of the American bishops speaks volumes, Jason Horowitz writes in the oligarchs’ New York Times. Horowitz himself is an outspoken apologist for aborting children which overtly turns his article into a propaganda piece. He concludes that divergence between the Pro-Life American Bishops and Francis’ pro-choice agenda is now so apparent as to become unremarkable. Horowitz reminds that John Paul II famously gave Communion to Francesco Rutelli, a former Roman mayor of Rome and candidate for prime minister who supported aborting children.

It’s Inconceivable

Horowitz knows that Francis wants to forget about abortion, focusing instead on the oligarchs’ pet subjects such as climate change, migration, and poverty. Therefore, the discussion of the American bishops will be useless because the bishops would need either unanimous support, which is impossible, or two-thirds support and the Vatican’s approval. A senior Vatican official inside the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith told Horowitz that “it’s not going to get to that point, it’s inconceivable.” So, the whole discussion is window dressing.

Many Nice Things

According to Horowitz, hierarchs close to Francis worried that the communion document could be used as a wedge issue to get Republican voters to the ballot box. He quotes “several experts” who said that they expected a document that will say many nice things on the Eucharist but will not call for denying communion to Abortion President Biden and other political and cultural figures who support killing unborn children. In order words: The status quo will prevail.

Denying communion to a politician in Italy

Horowitz refers to a Saturday meeting of Francis with a group of Roman deacons in the Hall of Blessings in the Apostolic Palace. As the deacons left the meeting and walked out onto St. Peter’s Square, several told Horowitz that they had never heard of an Italian priest denying communion to a politician for any reason and that there was a clear divide between politics, which belonged in Parliament, and faith, which belonged in Church. However, this divide works only one way around in order to promote vice and sin. It is enough to kneel for receiving Communion to be refused it in most Roman churches.