Clicks1.2K
en.news
4

Did A Catholic Convert Foresee the Coronavirus?

The known American author Dean Koontz, 74, wrote in 1981 the thriller "The Eyes of Darkness" about a mother who wants to know whether her son truly had died.

The novel mentions a bioweapon called "Gorki-400." Gorki (now: Nizhny Novgorod) is a Russian city.

Due to the end of the Cold War, “Gorki-400” was renamed "Wuhan-400" for the 2008 edition onward, referring to the Wuhan Institute of Virology.

This prompted speculation that Koontz had predicted the coronavirus disease. However, Koontz’ virus, unlike the coronavirus, kills everybody within 24 hours by infecting the brain stem.

Koontz became a Catholic while in college because faith encourages a "joy about the gift of life". He says that spirituality has always been part of his books.

#newsVaggdsfehc
Eva
Dean Koontz is traditionalist

What’s your least favorite thing about being a Catholic?
How Vatican II threw away so much tradition. It’s only beginning to come back. The Latin Mass and all of that was a great loss, something that is embraced and promoted for hundreds upon hundreds of years and then disappears overnight in an attempt to satisfy an urge toward trendiness. It was a great loss to …
More
Dean Koontz is traditionalist

What’s your least favorite thing about being a Catholic?
How Vatican II threw away so much tradition. It’s only beginning to come back. The Latin Mass and all of that was a great loss, something that is embraced and promoted for hundreds upon hundreds of years and then disappears overnight in an attempt to satisfy an urge toward trendiness. It was a great loss to the church, and I think it still is.

Why did you convert to Catholicism from the United Church of Christ in which you were brought up?

I was from a dysfunctional family. And although my mother made sure I went to church, the family didn’t reflect the values of the church. There wasn’t a lot of closeness among relatives in our family.
When I started dating Gerda, we didn’t have much money. We would go on Sundays to neighboring Jonestown, where she had aunts and uncles. I was so impressed with the sense of family among them and the fun they had being together and the easiness with which they interacted that I, either rightly or wrongly, identified that in my mind as being a consequence of Catholicism, which was so strong for all of them. So, it got me interested in it. When I was in college, I expanded my reading about things and ended up thinking about halfway through college that this was for me.
mattsixteen24
Here is an article that mentions more shocking info from Koontz's book. The book mentions the whistleblower doctor. Same age and name. www.zerohedge.com/health/six-reasons-why…
De Profundis
Off Topic. nice joke
Novella Nurney
Never would have guessed Koontz was Catholic.