Conversion - Scott Hahn
Jeffrey Ade
Wonderful book, "The Father who keeps His promises!"
De Profundis shares this
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Life is not black-white.
Roberto 55
for somebody only black... 🤪
Ultraviolet
Matthew 12:30 "He that is not with me, is against me:" Clearly Jesus was an absolutist unlike Scott Holm.
Ultraviolet
@Mathathias Maccabeus My mistake. Thank you for noting this. I mistyped the author's name. ;) However, his quote isn't right. A person's spritiual growth and faith is ongoing and ever-deepening. But the act of conversion, that moment when a heretic, schismatic, or a pagan comes to realize the truth of Christ and His Church. That is a one-time event.
3 more comments from Ultraviolet
Ultraviolet
The author made no such distinction. ;-) Conversion, in a religious context, usually refers to converting to a faith. Also, both examples the author gave were of men who were noted for realizing the truth of Christ and His Church, i.e. converting to a faith.
Ultraviolet
St. Peter denied knowing Christ as an individual. He did not deny that Christ was Christ or the Messiah or the Son of God. ;-)

You're welcome to speculate on possible alternative interpretations of what the author may have meant in the full context of his writings. Until then, his quote stands on its own. While we've been discussing this, someone helpfully sent me additional support for …More
St. Peter denied knowing Christ as an individual. He did not deny that Christ was Christ or the Messiah or the Son of God. ;-)

You're welcome to speculate on possible alternative interpretations of what the author may have meant in the full context of his writings. Until then, his quote stands on its own. While we've been discussing this, someone helpfully sent me additional support for my position, via the Catholic Encylopedia.

--"In the Latin Vulgate (Acts 15:3), in patristic (St. Augustine, Civ. Dei, VIII, xxiv), and in later ecclesiastical Latin, conversion refers to a moral change, a turning or returning to God and to the true religion, in which sense it has passed into our modern languages. (For example, the "conversions" of St. Paul, of Constantine the Great, and of St. Augustine.)"--

Notice, Catholic Encylopedia's primary definition of "conversion" focuses on the same usage I'm noting, namely converting to the true faith from some other. Notice also, one of the examples they gave for this particular sense of the word "conversion" is identical to the quoted author, namely St. Paul.
Ultraviolet
@Mathathias Maccabeus No good deed goes unpunished. ;-)