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St. Elizabeth of Hungary - Feast on 17 November (New) and 19 November (Old) and Bl. Ivetta - repost - ON HEARING MASS DAILY, PART 3: LADIES DRESS:

"ON HEARING MASS DAILY, PART 3: LADIES DRESS" - "The hidden treasure of the Holy Mass" - St Leonard of Port-Maurice

"A lady who enters church decked out with various ornaments is apt to attract attention, and perhaps, though God forbid it, to withdraw hearts from the worship of God. It is needless to adduce examples to encourage ladies to hear holy Mass every day. Truly they are but too well inclined to frequent churches, and the thing in point is to make them understand with what modesty and reverence they ought to demean themselves in the house of God, and more particularly when the holy sacrifice is being celebrated; since, however much many ladies edify me, appearing as they do before the altars in simple dress, without variety of color, without anything elaborate or curious, I am as much scandalized, on the other hand, by those vain trifling creatures who, arrayed in the fashion of the hour, and with an air caught as it were from the theatre, almost seem as if they would be the goddesses of some temple. The Blessed Ivetta, herself a noble Flemish lady, had once a wonderful vision in church. Such a one as I have mentioned was not far distant from her during holy Mass, magnificently dressed, and the Saint was enlightened to see the disposition of her heart, and the vain, worldly, and even impure thoughts which came and went freely through her mind without any check. And all the while she perceived that there were evil spirits close to this self-complacent woman of fashion, who would at times seem to touch her lace or her ribbons as objects of which they had a care. The lady approached the altar-rails for holy Communion; the priest descended the steps, the adorable Sacrament in his hand, when, lo, the Saviour separated Himself from the sacred particle, and ascending heavenward, disappeared, refusing to enter the mouth of one so wretched as to carry her vanity into His very presence and there complacently to dwell on thoughts of sin. The Saint was made clearly to understand that the evil spirits who were near her found in her luxury and vanity of dress something congenial to their minds and easy instruments for her ruin, and that the Saviour refused to be given to her because of her sinful dispositions. Quoniam in malevolam animam non introibit sapientia, nec habitabit in corpore subdito peccatis, "For wisdom will not enter into a malicious soul, nor dwell in a body subject to sins" (Wis. i. 4).

But you will say to me that you are not of the number of those so corrupt and lost; and I believe you-----with all frankness I believe you: but yet all that finery, those perfumes, that search after effect; that studious calculation of means to heighten every good feature of face, figure, or complexion; that pride of splendor and outlay; how shall these things be sternly enough denounced? Do you not, so far as you can, degrade the house of God; do you not rob Christ of honor, by casting more or less of distraction by your demeanor and your finery? Ah, enter into your own hearts, and resolve to imitate St. Elizabeth of Hungary-----a Saint, a queen, who would go with all royal pomp to holy Mass, but on entering church would take the crown from her head, the jewels from her fingers, and, despoiled of all ornament, would remain covered with a veil, so modest in deportment that she was never seen to direct a glance in any direction but the altar. This so pleased Almighty God that He chose to make His satisfaction apparent to all; for once, during Mass, the Saint was so glorified with Divine splendor that the eyes which looked on her were dazzled, and she seemed to all as it were an angel of paradise. Make use of this noble example, and be assured you will thus become pleasing to God and to man, and your share in the divine sacrifice will be of the highest profit to you in this life and in the next.

Edmund Blair Leighton - The Charity of St. Elizabeth of Hungary:

V.R.S.
It reminds me I should return to translating of the Montalembert's book on St. Elisabeth.
Credo .
Beautiful picture! 😍
andrew24157
Credo . A couple more outstanding paintings from my collection of this great saint - Elizabeth/Elisabeth of Hungary.
Bitschnau-Elisabeth-of Hungary:
Calderon_Philip_Hermogenes_St_Elizabeth_of_Hungary - Great Act of Renunciation:
Marianne_Stokes_St_Elizabeth_of_Hungary_Spinning_for_the_Poor:
Daniel Gran - St Elizabeth Distributing Alms:
MASTERS, unknown German painters - St Elizabeth Clothes the …More
Credo . A couple more outstanding paintings from my collection of this great saint - Elizabeth/Elisabeth of Hungary.

Bitschnau-Elisabeth-of Hungary:

Calderon_Philip_Hermogenes_St_Elizabeth_of_Hungary - Great Act of Renunciation:

Marianne_Stokes_St_Elizabeth_of_Hungary_Spinning_for_the_Poor:

Daniel Gran - St Elizabeth Distributing Alms:

MASTERS, unknown German painters - St Elizabeth Clothes the Poor and Tends the Sick:

PITTONI, Giambattista - St Elizabeth Distributing Alms:

Rudolf Moroder - Elisabeth_of_Hungary:

SCHEDONI, Bartolomeo - The Charity of St Elizabeth of Hungary:

Sebastiano Ricci - St Elisabeth of Hungary: