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Saint Colette Feb 7 breski1 | February 07, 2008 Saint Colette (13 January 1381 – 6 March 1447), born Nicolette Boylet (or Boellet), was an abbess and the foundress of the Colettine Poor Clares, a …More
Saint Colette Feb 7

breski1 | February 07, 2008 Saint Colette (13 January 1381 – 6 March 1447), born Nicolette Boylet (or Boellet), was an abbess and the foundress of the Colettine Poor Clares, a reform movement of the nuns of the Order of Saint Clare (the Clarisses).
Irapuato
FEBRUARY 7, 2011
DAILY PRAYER WITH REGNUM CHRISTI
FAITH AND CHRIST'S HEALING POWER
February 7, 2011
Monday of the Fifth Week of Ordinary Time
Mark 6:53-56
After making the crossing, they came to land at Gennesaret and tied
up there. As they were leaving the boat, people immediately
recognized him. They scurried about the surrounding country and began
to bring in the sick on mats to where…More
FEBRUARY 7, 2011
DAILY PRAYER WITH REGNUM CHRISTI
FAITH AND CHRIST'S HEALING POWER
February 7, 2011
Monday of the Fifth Week of Ordinary Time
Mark 6:53-56
After making the crossing, they came to land at Gennesaret and tied
up there. As they were leaving the boat, people immediately
recognized him. They scurried about the surrounding country and began
to bring in the sick on mats to wherever they heard he was. Whatever
villages or towns or countryside he entered, they laid the sick in
the marketplaces and begged him that they might touch only the
tassel on his cloak; and as many as touched it were healed.
Introductory Prayer: I believe in your power of healing grace, in
your capacity to heal both physically and spiritually. I come to you
in spiritual illness and weakness, confident in your desire to heal
and strengthen me. I humbly offer you my soul, wounded and aching
from the spiritual cancer of self-love, pride and self-sufficiency. I
abandon myself to your loving mercy. Thank you, Lord, for watching
over me and loving me unconditionally.
Petition: Lord, heal my heart and soul, and help me to do what I
must do to maintain my spiritual health.
1. "People recognized him, and started hurrying all through the
countryside." For the most part, the people in this Gospel were not
"hurrying throughout the countryside" to invite others to come and
seek forgiveness and spiritual healing from Jesus. They were in
haste, yes, but in haste to bring the sick so that the Lord would
heal them from their physically infirmities. How blind is the human
heart that often fears physical illness more than spiritual
infirmities and falling out of God's grace! The gravest ills we can
suffer are those that come from within us: "For from the heart come
evil thoughts, murder, adultery, unchastity, theft, false witness,
blasphemy. These are what defile a person" (Matthew 15:19-20).
2. "They laid down the sick in the open spaces, begging him to let
them touch even the fringe of his cloak." Holy men and women
throughout the centuries have firmly believed that "touching" Christ
through receiving the sacraments brings about spiritual healing and
redemption. "My heart has been wounded by many sins," St. Ambrose
used to pray before he celebrated Mass, "my mind and tongue
carelessly left unguarded. Lord of kindness and power, in my
lowliness and need I am turning to you, the fountain of mercy; I am
hurrying to you to be healed; I am taking refuge under your
protection. I am longing to meet you, not as my Judge but as my
Savior. Lord, I am not ashamed to show you my wounds. Only you know
how many and how serious my sins are, and though they could make me
fear for my salvation, I am putting my hope in your mercies, which
are beyond count. Look on me with mercy, then, Lord Jesus Christ,
eternal King, God and man, crucified for our sake. I am putting my
trust in you, the fountain that will never stop flowing with merciful
love: hear me and forgive my sins and weaknesses."
3. "All those who touched him were cured." All those who touched
Jesus Christ with the touch of faith were cured: the Canaanite woman,
the blind man, the ten lepers, the man with a withered hand, the
paralytic, Jairus' daughter, the woman with the hemorrhage, the boy
with a demon, the Gerasene demoniac, the deaf man. All these people
in the Gospel had something in common: it was their faith that
allowed the Lord to heal them. The phrase used in the case of the
woman with the hemorrhage is telling: "power had gone out from him"
(Mark 5:30). Faith is one of the most powerful acts of the human
person, since God himself chooses to be moved by it. How strong is my
faith in the power of our Lord Jesus Christ? Do I reach out and
touch him in faith every day? Do I allow him to act in my life
through faith? What am I waiting for?
Conversation with Christ: Lord, you are all powerful and the source
of my salvation and spiritual healing. In this prayer I am reaching
out to touch you in faith, even though I am unworthy and my faith is
weak. Heal me, Lord. Give me the strength to resist the power of evil
in my life and to adhere to your grace and goodness. Lord, I
believe; increase my faith.
Resolution: I will offer up short acts of faith in the Lord
throughout the day. meditation.regnumchristi.org
Irapuato
SAINT COLETTEVirgin, Reformer of the Poor Clares (1380-1447)
After a holy childhood, Colette joined a society of devout women called the Beguines. Not finding their state sufficiently austere, she entered the Third Order of Saint Francis, and lived in a hut near her parish church of Corbie in Picardy. Here she had passed four years in extraordinary penance when Saint Francis, in a vision, bade …More
SAINT COLETTEVirgin, Reformer of the Poor Clares (1380-1447)
After a holy childhood, Colette joined a society of devout women called the Beguines. Not finding their state sufficiently austere, she entered the Third Order of Saint Francis, and lived in a hut near her parish church of Corbie in Picardy. Here she had passed four years in extraordinary penance when Saint Francis, in a vision, bade her undertake the reform of her Order, then much relaxed. She doubted for a time and was struck with muteness for three days and blindness for another three. Finally, fortified by ecclesiastical authority, she established the reform throughout a large part of Europe, and, in spite of the most violent opposition, founded seventeen convents of the strict observance.
By the same wonderful prudence she helped to heal the great schism which then afflicted the Church. The Fathers in council at Constance were in doubt as to how to deal with the three claimants to the tiara — John XXIII, Benedict XIII, and Gregory XII. At this crisis Colette, together with Saint Vincent Ferrer, wrote to the Fathers to depose Benedict XIII, who alone refused his consent to a new election. This was done, and Martin V was elected, to the great good of the Church.
Colette also assisted the Council of Basle by her advice and prayers, and when God revealed to her the spirit of revolt which was rising there, she warned the bishops and legates to retire from the council.
Saint Colette never ceased to pray for the Church, while the devils, for their part, never ceased to assault her. They swarmed round her in the form of hideous insects, buzzing and stinging her tender skin. They brought into her cell the decaying corpses of public criminals, and assuming monstrous forms themselves, struck her savage blows. Or they would appear in the most seductive guise, and tempt her by many deceits to sin. Saint Colette once complained to Our Lord that the demons prevented her from praying. “Cease, then,” said the devil to her, “your prayers to the great Master of the Church, and we will cease to torment you; for you torment us more by your prayers than we do you.” Yet the virgin of Christ triumphed alike over their threats and their allurements, and said she would count the day during which she suffered nothing for her God, the unhappiest of her life. She died March 6, 1447, in a transport of intercession for sinners and the Church.
Reflection. One of the greatest tests of being a good Catholic is zeal for the Church and devotion to Christ’s Vicar.
Sources: Little Pictorial Lives of the Saints, a compilation based on Butler’s Lives of the Saints and other sources by John Gilmary Shea (Benziger Brothers: New York, 1894); Les Petits Bollandistes: Vies des Saints, by Msgr. Paul Guérin (Bloud et Barral: Paris, 1882), Vol. 3.
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Irapuato
Saint Colette (13 January 1381 – 6 March 1447), born Nicolette Boylet (or Boellet), was an abbess and the foundress of the Colettine Poor Clares, a reform movement of the nuns of the Order of Saint Clare (the Clarisses).
[edit] Life
Born at Calcye, near Corbie in Picardy, in January 1381, her father, Robert Boellet, was the carpenter of the famous Benedictine Abbey of Corbie. Her mother's name …More
Saint Colette (13 January 1381 – 6 March 1447), born Nicolette Boylet (or Boellet), was an abbess and the foundress of the Colettine Poor Clares, a reform movement of the nuns of the Order of Saint Clare (the Clarisses).
[edit] Life
Born at Calcye, near Corbie in Picardy, in January 1381, her father, Robert Boellet, was the carpenter of the famous Benedictine Abbey of Corbie. Her mother's name was Marguerite Moyon. After her parents died in 1398, she joined the Beguines but found their manner of life unchallenging. She received the religious habit of a tertiary of the Franciscan order,[1] and became a hermit under the direction of the Abbot of Corbie, living near the abbey church. After several years of following this ascetic way of life, through several dreams and visions, she believed that she was being called to reform the Poor Clares, and return it to its original Franciscan ideals of absolute poverty and austerity.
She turned to the Antipope Benedict XIII of Avignon who was recognized in France as the rightful pope. Benedict allowed her to enter the Franciscan order of Poor Clares and empowered her by several Papal Bulls, issued between 1406 and 1412, to found new monasteries and complete the reform of the order.[2]
With the approval of the Countess of Geneva and the aid of the Franciscan itinerant preacher, Henry of Beaume (her confessor and spiritual guide), Colette began her work at Beaume, in the diocese of Geneva. She remained there but a short time and soon opened at Besançon her first monastery in an almost-abandoned house of Urbanist Poor Clares. Thence her reform spread to Auxonne (1410), to Poligny, to Ghent (1412), to Heidelberg (1444), to Amiens, and to other communities of Poor Clares. To the seventeen monasteries founded during her lifetime must be added another begun by her at Pont-à-Mousson in Lorraine. For the monasteries which followed her reform, she prescribed extreme poverty, going barefoot, and the observance of perpetual fast and abstinence.
During the Council of Constance she wrote to disavow Benedict, and during the Council of Basel she wrote to ask the bishops to withdraw.
She also inaugurated a reform among the Franciscan friars (the Coletani), not to be confounded with the Observants. These Coletani remained obedient to the authority of the provincial of the Franciscan convents, and never attained much importance, even in France. In 1448 they had only thirteen convents, and--together with other small branches of the Order of Friars Minor--were suppressed in 1517 by Leo X.
In addition to the strict rules of the Poor Clares, the Colettines follow their special constitutions sanctioned in 1434 by the then-Minister General of the friars, William of Casale, and approved in 1448 by Pope Nicholas V, in 1458 by Pope Pius II, and in 1482 by Pope Sixtus IV.
Colette died at Ghent in 1447. She was beatified 23 January 1740, and canonized 24 May 1807. The Colettine nuns are found today, outside of France, in Belgium, Germany, Spain, England, and the United States.[3]
[edit] External links
Saint Colette
Heny of Beaume
[edit] References
^ Farmer, David (ed.) Oxford Dictionary of Saints, Oxford University Press (1997), p. 108
^ Farmer, David (ed.) Oxford Dictionary of Saints, p. 108
^ Catholic Encyclopedia: Saint Colette
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Saint_Colette