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Letter of James 3,16-18.4,1-3. breski1 For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there is disorder and every foul practice. But the wisdom from above is first of all pure, then peaceable, gentl…More
Letter of James 3,16-18.4,1-3. breski1
For where jealousy and selfish ambition exist, there is disorder and every foul practice.
But the wisdom from above is first of all pure, then peaceable, gentle, compliant, full of mercy and good fruits, without inconstancy or insincerity.
And the fruit of righteousness is sown in peace for those who cultivate peace.
Where do the wars and where do the conflicts among you come from? Is it not from your passions that make war within your members?
You covet but do not possess. You kill and envy but you cannot obtain; you fight and wage war. You do not possess because you do not ask.
You ask but do not receive, because you ask wrongly, to spend it on your passions.

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Mark 9,30-37.
Jesus and his disciples left from there and began a journey through Galilee, but he did not wish anyone to know about it.
He was teaching his disciples and telling them, "The Son of Man is to be handed over to men and they will kill him, and three days after his death he will rise."
But they did not understand the saying, and they were afraid to question him.
They came to Capernaum and, once inside the house, he began to ask them, "What were you arguing about on the way?"
But they remained silent. They had been discussing among themselves on the way who was the greatest.
Then he sat down, called the Twelve, and said to them, "If anyone wishes to be first, he shall be the last of all and the servant of all."
Taking a child he placed it in their midst, and putting his arms around it he said to them,
Whoever receives one child such as this in my name, receives me; and whoever receives me, receives not me but the one who sent me."

Copyright © Confraternity of Christian Doctrine, USCCB


Saint Maximus of Turin (?-c.420)

Bishop
Sermon 58 ; PL 57, 363

"Whoever receives one child such as this in my name, receives me"
We Christians are Christ's body and members, the apostle Paul says (1Cor 12,27). At Christ's resurrection all his members were raised with him and, as he passed from hell to earth, he made us pass from death to life. The word “Pasch” in Hebrew means “passover” or “passage”. Isn't this mystery a mystery concerning the passage from evil to good? And what a passing over it is! From sin to righteousness, from vice to virtue, from age to infancy. I'm speaking here about the infancy that pertains to simplicity, not to age. For virtues, too, belong to their age. Yesterday the decrepitude of sin was sending us downhill. But the resurrection of Christ brings us to rebirth into the innocence of children. Christian simplicity makes childhood its own. Children are without malice; they do not know deceit; they dare not strike. Thus this christian child does not fall into a rage if he is insulted nor defend himself if he is stripped nor hit back if he is struck. Our Lord even requires him to pray for his enemies, relinquish both tunic and cloak to the thief and turn the other cheek to those who strike him (Mt 5,29f.). Christ's infancy surpasses human infancy... The latter owes its innocence to weakness, the former to virtue. Moreover, it is worthy of far greater praise: his hatred of evil comes from his will, not his powerlessness.