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New Information from Germany About the Anti-Benedict Campaign A Lawyer. The German journalist Bernd Meuser examined who advised the almost 95-year-old Benedict XVI in writing his 82-page statement…More
New Information from Germany About the Anti-Benedict Campaign

A Lawyer.
The German journalist Bernd Meuser examined who advised the almost 95-year-old Benedict XVI in writing his 82-page statement, or rather, who penned it for him. The text concentrates entirely on the justiciable dimension of the matter. The author was clearly concerned to dispel the suspicion that something had gone wrong in a legal sense.

The Reason for the Campaign. Meuser, himself a victim of abuse, emphasises that Ratzinger, as Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith and Pope, has done more against abuse than anyone before him. Now the gardener is being turned into the goat, while the big goats stand by with their gardener's aprons, happy that they are not in the limelight. For Meuser, the - quote "mendacious and profoundly dishonest campaign against Benedict serves to disconnect a German national church from the universal Catholic Church." The German synodal path is seeking a justification for a schism that already exists in fact.

No Facts. For Meuser, the claim of media activists that Benedict lied, is an infamous insinuation because this is only about remembering an ordinariate meeting which took place over 42 years ago. Meuser points out that for most of the accusations against Benedict there are no usable facts, let alone solid circumstantial evidence. The only evidence is the ordinariate meeting in Munich but it does not emerge from their files that the participants knew at the meeting that the priest they allowed to come to Munich was an abuser.

The German historian Michael Hesemann states that Benedict's false recollection is a trivial matter. Not even the biased Munich report claims that Ratzinger knew about the priest's background. According to the report, a representative of Essen diocese called the Munich ordinariate in December 1979 asking to temporarily reassign a younger Essen priest who was going to Munich - quote - "for medical psychotherapeutic treatment". He was presented as a very talented and versatile man. There is also a written request from Essen asking to accept the priest temporarily, saying that he could be used for church services and teaching. It mentions a - quote - “endangerment" which had led Essen to take him out of pastoral care so that he could undergo "psycho-therapeutic" treatment in Munich." Hesemann explains that the priest's criminal record was not mentioned, and "endangerment" could mean anything. Conclusion: Benedict told the truth.
Jan Kanty Lipski