Ultraviolet
Half a century clouds Mr. Purcell's memory. Some of his claims are insane... "The floors were so clean, you could eat off of them. The blackboards had a brighter sheen than a Cadillac fender"

A classroom with a dozen children tramping through it every day had sanitary, food-safe floors? As Mr. Purcell "remembers" it , the nuns didn't write anything on the blackboard! That would make the board…More
Half a century clouds Mr. Purcell's memory. Some of his claims are insane... "The floors were so clean, you could eat off of them. The blackboards had a brighter sheen than a Cadillac fender"

A classroom with a dozen children tramping through it every day had sanitary, food-safe floors? As Mr. Purcell "remembers" it , the nuns didn't write anything on the blackboard! That would make the boards dusty and cloudy with chalk. But Mr. Purcell insists they "had a brighter sheen than a Cadillac fender."

"There was no daydreaming, talking, joking or doodling."


...because Sister can read minds, amirite? She also could see every paper on every desk at all times, amirite?

...in Mr. Purcell's "remembered" classes, perhaps. :P In every class I've ever had, the instructor (nun or not) used the blackboards to teach their students instead of spending all day terrorizing them to the point where they won't even think.

"They (the nuns) also worked hard to teach the pupils the basic skills necessary for thriving as an adult: math, science, reading and writing."

...but not by ever chalking up those perfectly polished Cadillac fender black-boards. :That must have been quite a feat. ;-)
Orthocat
I dunno, the author looks kinda young to have really experienced what he writes about. I grew up in the same area of the country. I'm nearly 60 and the 'habited nun' was already an endangered species by the 1970s. Our parish only had one sister who dressed in lay clothes. And she did liturgy stuff. Religious education was handled by parents & volunteers. Seems like the writer's just repeating a …More
I dunno, the author looks kinda young to have really experienced what he writes about. I grew up in the same area of the country. I'm nearly 60 and the 'habited nun' was already an endangered species by the 1970s. Our parish only had one sister who dressed in lay clothes. And she did liturgy stuff. Religious education was handled by parents & volunteers. Seems like the writer's just repeating a lot of tropes & stereotypes about those "mean sisters" and how he 'survived' their cruel discipline.