Clicks1.6K

J.S. Bach BWV 244 Matthäus-Passion - Raphaël Pichon & Ensemble Pygmalion

Klassikfreund
1
J. S. Bach - BWV 244 - Matthäus Passion Programm des Videos: • Johann Sebastian Bach: Matthäus-Passion, BWV 244 - Part I • Jacobus Gallus: Ecce quomodo moritur justus • Johann Sebastian Bach: Matth…More
J. S. Bach - BWV 244 - Matthäus Passion

Programm des Videos:

• Johann Sebastian Bach: Matthäus-Passion, BWV 244 - Part I
• Jacobus Gallus: Ecce quomodo moritur justus
• Johann Sebastian Bach: Matthäus-Passion, BWV 244 - Part II

Between the first part and the second part of the St. Matthew Passion, sounds a vocal work by Jacobus Gallus (1550-1591) "Ecce quomodo moritur justus"

Ausführende:

Conductor Raphaël Pichon & Ensemble Pygmalion.

Julian Prégardien (Evangéliste)
Stéphane Degout (Jesus & bass I)
Christian Immler (Pilate & bass II)
Sabine Devieilhe (soprano I)
Maïlys de Villoutreys (soprano II)
Damien Guillon (alto I)
Lucile Richardot (alto II)
Samuel Boden (tenor I)
Thomas Hobbs (tenor II)
Virgile Ancely & Geoffroy Buffière (Pontifex I & II)

Recording from 26. März 2016 Chapelle royale du Château de Versailles (Versailles, Frankreich)

Die Matthäus-Passion, BWV 244, ist eine oratorische Passion von Johann Sebastian Bach.

This concert pays a tribute to the victimes of the Brussels terror attacks of 22. March 2016. Raphaël Pichon conducts Bach's Saint Matthew Passion, one of the most iconic and monumental works in the Western sacred repertoire, at the Chapelle Royale du Château de Versailles. This event features Julian Prégardien, Stéphane Degout, Sabine Devieilhe and the Ensemble Pygmalion.
Bach's Saint Matthew Passion is a monumental musical work: two choirs, two orchestras, four soloists and one narrator embodying Matthew the Evangelist. But beyond the extraordinary mass sonority, it is the dramatic tension of the Passion's narrative that holds the spectators spellbound during this three-hour long oratorio.

Saint Matthew Passion explores the whole spectrum of human passions and seems to sublimate them in an archetypal musical expression, as shown by the aria "Erbarme dich." Probably the best-known aria of the whole score, "Erbarme dich" expresses admirably the remorse and grief of Peter the Apostle when he "remembered the word of Jesus who had said to him, 'Before the rooster crows, you will deny Me three times.' So he went out and wept bitterly" (Matt. 26:75). The melodic lines of the duet made up of the violin and the soloist hint subtly Peter's plea for forgiveness, and eventually, his hope in salvation.
-------------------------------------------
Cristina Pedroso likes this.